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Here you will find an evolving list of researchers around the world who do agent-based modeling or related work. This list is intended as a resource for those interested in discovering people doing interesting research in ABM or related fields in different disciplines. Where ever possible, I try to link a picture of the person, which is directly linked to their website.

Total Researchers Listed on this Page: 14



Paul Waddell

Paul Waddell



Paul Waddell teaches and conducts research on modeling and planning in the domains of land use, housing, economic geography, transportation, and the environment. He has led the development of the UrbanSim model of urban development and the Open Platform for Urban Simulation, now used by Metropolitan Planning Organizations and other local and regional agencies for operational planning purposes in a variety of U.S. metropolitan areas such as Detroit, Houston, Phoenix, Salt Lake City, San Francisco, and Seattle, as well as internationally in a growing list of cities in Europe, Asia, and Africa. His current research focuses on the assessment of the impacts of land use regulations and transportation investments on outcomes such as spatial patterns of real estate development and prices, travel behavior, emissions, and resource consumption. He is also working on ways to engage public participation in making complex policy choices.



Dawn Walker

Dawn Walker



Dawn Walker’s main research area is the development of agent–based models of cellular interactions. Her work is closely linked with the Epitheliome project, which is developing agent models to simulate growth and repair in epithelial tissues. She is also interested in how different types of computational models representing different spatial and temporal scales can be used together to understand biomedical phenomena. The COAST project is modelling the process of in-stent restenosis in coronary arteries using this approach. Finally, she also collaborate with researchers and clinicians in the Medical School who are interested in using Electrical Impedance Spectroscopy (EIS) in order to identify changes in epithelial tissue structure.



Jianhui Wang

Jianhui Wang



Dr. Wang received his B.S. degree in management science and engineering and Master’s degree in technical economics and management from North China Electric Power University, China, in 2001 and 2004, and his Ph.D. in electrical engineering from Illinois Institute of Technology, USA, in 2007. Presently, he is an assistant computational engineer with the Decision and Information Sciences division at Argonne National Laboratory. He is the chair of the IEEE Power & Energy Society (PES) power system operation methods subcommittee and co-chair of an IEEE task force on integration of wind and solar power into power system operations. He has authored/co-authored more than 60 journal and conference publications. His papers have been published in leading energy economics and engineering journals including Energy, Energy Policy and IEEE Transactions on Power Systems. He is an editor of the IEEE Transactions on Smart Grid and an associate editor of the International Journal of Renewable Energy Technology.



Pei Wang

Pei Wang



Pei Wang’s research interests include Artificial Intelligence (AI), NARS (Non-Axiomatic Reasoning System), and AGI (Artificial General Intelligence).



Christopher Watts

Christopher Watts



Christopher Watts’s  varied background includes Philosophy and Theology at Cambridge, jobs as a management consultant and as a business trainer, and Operational Research at Southampton and at Warwick Business School. Throughout his career he has maintained an interest in the use of computer models to explore the phenomena of Complexity and Emergence. For his PhD he built agent-based simulation models of “energisers” in social networks, based on the sociological theory of Interaction Rituals and the psychological theory of intrinsic motivation. As a Research Fellow at CRESS he will work on the SIMIAN project on “Models of Genuine Novelty”.



D. G. Webster

D. G. Webster



Professor Webster’s research focuses on modeling human-environment interactions as complex adaptive systems.



Jacob Weiner

Jacob Weiner



Jacob Weiner’s research focuses on several areas of ecology, including plant competition at the individual and population levels, plant growth and resource allocation, individual variation within plant populations, the application of ecological and evolutionary knowledge to plant production systems, and the relationship between ecology and environmental sciences.



Michael P. Wellman

Michael P. Wellman



Michael P. Wellman’s research focuses how agents make decisions when outcomes depend on the behavior of other autonomous agents. He leads the strategic reasoning group (SRG) at the University of Michigan, which develops techniques for understanding and engineering complex multiagent environments, using concepts and methods from economics as well as computer science. The SRG is particularly interested in domains involving markets and commerce, and other environments characterized by dynamism and uncertainty.



Michael Widener

Michael Widener



Michael Widener’s current interests include computational methods, spatial complexity, urban Systems, accessibility, social theory, and being vague. I hope to explore complex social systems through the use of qualitative and quantitative methods.



Uri Wilensky

Uri Wilensky



Uri Wilensky’s research focuses on the creation of a theory of “Connected Science” learning environments. He has also had a special interest in building computational tools to make difficult subject matter (e.g., artifical life and other complex systems) accessible to non-experts by building computer microworlds including the agent-based modeling simulator, NetLogo.



Ian  Wilkinson

Ian Wilkinson



Ian Wilkinson’s research focus is on business to business marketing, with an emphasis on the nature and role of business relations and networks. He is currently examining the structure and dynamics of actual business relations and networks using case studies and, with others as part of an ARC Discovery project, developing agent based models of the development and evolution of business relations and networks in order to develop ‘flight simulators’ for managers and policy makers. Other interests include innovation and opportunity discovery processes in business, the reliability and validity of managers as key informants in surveys, complex systems theory and management and process theories of change.



Robb Willer

Robb Willer



Robb Willer is a multi-method researcher conducting empirical and theoretical work in the fields of social psychology, mathematical sociology, social networks, political psychology, and organizational behavior. His past agent-based modeling work has investigated the origins of unpopular norms and the dynamics of residential segregation.



James (Jim) Wilson

James (Jim) Wilson



Jim Wilson’s My research concentrates on strongly interdisciplinary (science/social science) approaches to the management of ocean resources; it emphasizes the perspectives of complex adaptive systems theory and, on the social side, institutional economics. I tend to work more often with scientists than I do with social scientists. I created and am coordinator of a unique ‘dual degree’ program in which students obtain a master’s in marine biology or oceanography and a second master’s in marine policy. I try to ground my academic work in the reality of New England fisheries and have had very strong working relationships with large numbers of fishermen, and state and federal managers over the years.



Bruce P. Winterhalder

Bruce P. Winterhalder



The research areas that interest and excite him most are human behavioral and evolutionary ecology, cultural ecology, hunter-gatherers of sub-arctic Canada and agriculturalists of the central Andes, Peru. his theoretical approach is evolutionary. His methods are those of simple graphical or mathematical models. His goal is analysis of the economic and population behavior of human foragers and small-scale farmers. In his earliest work he examined resource-use decisions of hunter-gatherers. Over time, he has developed models which take into account a broader array of demographic and environmental factors, including stochastic variation in ecological variables and the population ecology of humans and their living resources. Similarly he has expanded his analytic frameworks to encompass agent-based modeling and risk-sensitive techniques of analysis, the latter focused currently on relationships between fertility, mortality risk, and completed family size. Much of his work has been grounded with empirical data gathered in the field in Canada, Peru, and Ecuador.


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